Quote without an Introductory Phrase (Introduce the Quote)

Essay Section: Supporting Evidence (Quotes)

Quote without an Introductory Phrase

Excerpt #2

“One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder” ().

These are the qualities of the above excerpt.

1) Just by examining the quote and nothing else, we do not know from where (what source) the student has taken the quote. We do not have some reference to location. If we pretend for the moment that we do not know from where these words have traveled, we must conclude that our task is far from complete.

2) We do not know the speaker of the words within the quotation marks. There is no indication of a speaker. These are just words within quotation marks. In addition, we don’t see the presence of the verbs “discuss” and “state.”

3) The student has not changed the words within the quotation marks. We know this because there isn’t present the application of an ellipsis. These words represent an exact replica of the words within the reference source, Du Bois’s book.

4) The incorporation of the quote conforms to normal grammar standards for presenting reported speech.

5) The quote is in the present tense.

What happens if we are provided with an introductory phrase?

Du Bois states, “One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder” ().

We now know who the speaker is and we know that the collection of words within quotation marks has a speaker. Through research, we can track the speaker and possibly find the location of the words. However, without a title of the book, it makes the job more difficult. What happens if we are provided with an introductory phrase that has a reference?

Du Bois states in The Souls of Black Folk, “One ever feels his two-ness,—an American, a Negro two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder” ().

Now we have all of the location information we need. However, what does this exercise have to do with Changes to Grammar? Applying such verbs as “discuss” and “state” are typically easier to do than changing elements of the quote to conform to other principles of grammar. The purpose of the above is just to help you understand what you are doing each time you incorporate a quote. I want you to start understanding the importance of how valuable “necessary information” is within your sentences so that when your reader needs to research the information you have provided, he or she can perform the research efficiently.

Click here for “Incorporating the Quote Grammatically.”

Click here to return to “Quote with Introductory Phrases.”

Click here to return to “Introduce the Quote.”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Advertisements
  1. Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: