Task #6: Sample

Sample

“Sample” falls under the Analysis Acronym (Revision) category.

Take a quote and examine it against your own statement or the whole body paragraph to ensure that your statement complements the quote. Let’s bring forward an example from the student essay.

Figure 85: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (Sampling Body Paragraph Exercise)

Steinbeck presents Elisa as inquisitive and strong-minded when it comes to thoughts, but fails on her actions.  Elisa questions the visitor as to whether or not he sleeps in the wagon; she tells him that it must be nice and wishes that women could do such things.  He replies that it isn’t the kind of place for a woman.  On the defensive, she questions his knowledge on his stated opinion.  He responds in protest that he doesn’t know and hands over the saucepans hurriedly.  He didn’t want to argue with her.  Elisa paid him for his time and replied, “You might be surprised to have a rival . . . I can sharpen scissors . . . I can beat the dents . . . I can show you what a woman might do” (Steinbeck 225).  Instead of say what a woman can do, she said might.  The whole objective of the visitor was to get what he wanted and be on his way.  He never concerned himself with the chrysanthemums.  It was apparent, because when he gathered up his things to leave, he had forgotten about the chrysanthemums; and Elisa failed to notice.  She was so preoccupied with the compliments made to her about her flowers she played into his deception.  As he left, she mumbled aloud, “That’s a bright direction.  There’s a glowing there”(Steinbeck 226).

Step #1: Highlight the quotes. Apply shading by using a highlighter; if you are working in Word, use shading or bolding.

Step #2: Underline the statements. Underline the statements before and after the quote. Underline only those statements that have a direct relationship to the quote.

Step #3: Mirror the quote and the statement. If you are working in Word, cut and paste the quote and the statement(s) into a separate Word document. If you are working from a hardcopy, make sure the paragraph you are working on is free from any correction marks from a previous activity. You may want to print out a new copy of the page with the paragraph. Let’s bring forward the example.

Table 24: Sentence/Quote/Follow-Up Explanation Comparisons (Sampling Body Paragraph Exercise) 

 Prep Statement
Elisa questions the visitor as to whether or not he sleeps in the wagon; she tells him that it must be nice and wishes that women could do such things.  He replies that it isn’t the kind of place for a woman.
 Quote Elisa paid him for his time and replied, 1 “You might be surprised to have a rival . . . 2 I can sharpen scissors . . . 3 I can beat the dents . . . 4 I can show you what a woman might do”(Steinbeck 225).
 Follow-up explanation Instead of say what a woman can do, she said 1 might.

Step #4: Number the parts.

  • Number the part(s) of the quote first.
  • Number the part(s) of the statement(s) before the quote.
  • Number the part(s) of the statement(s) after the quote (follow-up explanation).

Step #5: Outline the parts of the quote. List the parts.

  • “You might be surprised to have a rival.”
  • “I can sharpen scissors.”
  • “I can beat the dents.”
  • “I can show you what a woman might do.”

Step #6:  Choose an option.

Option #1: Revising the statement(s). Keep the quote and revise any statement(s) that does not have the same parts as the quote. How and where you incorporate the quote is important, but how you support the quote is a skill that many still lack. People typically only support the ideas they perceive are important in the quote, failing to consider the quote as a whole with different meanings and parts.                                                       

  • Use the quote as your guide and number the parts of your statement(s).
  • Square the statements with the quote.

Option #2: Deleting the statement(s). Keep the quote and delete any statement(s) that does not sufficiently support the quote. This includes deleting either the prep statement or the follow-up explanation or both. Statements that do not support the quote become the greatest stumbling blocks to the reader. They are distracting. Therefore, search specifically for statements that will hinder learning.

Option #3: Deleting the quote. This is rare, but it is possible that the quote doesn’t fit. Don’t make something fit that doesn’t have any relation at all to the ideas expressed within your statements.

Option #4: Deleting the statements. This is not rare. Oftentimes, there is nothing wrong with the quote. Sometimes the quote functions well without the prep statement, for example. Each case is different.

Option #5: Deleting both the quote and the statements. If you discover that both the quote and the statements do not fit within your discussion, then you must garner up the courage to delete them both. Never depend on a quote so much to the point that you feel loss without it. The quote is your tool, not the other way around. You determine if a quote will be viable to your discussion or not. Get in the habit of deleting quotes, statements and sometimes whole paragraphs, when necessary.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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