Archive for category Definitions and Rules

Rule on Applying Contemporary Terms

Don’t apply concepts that are not already present in the work itself. In other words, stay within the context of the work. The author provides ample words and phrasing to use for evaluation. Bringing in foreign terms will only confuse the reader and you won’t maintain the integrity of the text.

This quick-reference topic falls under the post “Figure 65: Essay Excerpt on the Theme of Disloyalty in Cymbeline, William Shakespeare.” You may click the link to view the post. Figure 65 falls under the comment “Unclear.”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Rule on Applying Personification

Revise those sentences where you apply personification.

Here’s a general rule. Don’t do anything within your analysis that the literary text doesn’t do. For example, if the author uses personification as part of his right in terms of poetic license, then you also have permission to do the same within your analysis. In this instance, your analysis parallels the structure and context of the author’s work. However, if the author calls one character one thing, and you call the same character something else, then your analysis is not a full and complete reflection of the author’s work.

This rule falls under the comment “Wordy Phrasing.” To read the full post, click here.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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The FAVORS Definition of Thesis (Task #7: Integrate)

The FAVORS Definition of Thesis falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment),” “Case Studies,” and “Analysis Revision Tasks” categories or by typing “Task #7: Integrate” into the search box.

You may print the information for class discussions.

The thesis is a vision statement where the student is both author and visionary for the paper.

The thesis expresses the goals and plans of the paper. It establishes an overall general objective for the topic sentences (the troops) so that the objective can be divided into manageable and actionable parts to produce a measurable outcome.

To put it simply, the thesis is the order, in whole form. Each subsequent paragraph represents an extension and/or a part of the thesis.

To best understand how to integrate, or maintain, the thesis throughout the body of the paper, let’s bring in a military analogy.

Level 1: The captain of the thesis receives the thesis (order) from the student, divides it into manageable parts, and gives instructions to the lieutenant commander of body paragraphs.

Level 2: The lieutenant commander of body paragraphs receives the thesis, divides it into manageable parts, orders body paragraphs to support the thesis, and gives instructions to the first lieutenant of topic sentences to develop topic sentences that will support the thesis.

  • Body Paragraph #1 will incorporate a quote under three lines from author #1 to support the topic sentence (the lieutenant commander of topic sentences).
  • After each quote, Body Paragraph #1 must follow up with an explanation and an evaluation of the quote.
  • Body Paragraph #1 will prepare a transition statement for Body Paragraph #2.

Level 3: The first lieutenant of topic sentences receives the order for body paragraphs, divides the order into five manageable parts, defines what will be in the topic sentences, creates topic sentences, and gives instructions to the second lieutenant of examples, descriptions, definitions, explanations, and evaluations to create supporting evidence for each topic sentence in order to support the thesis.

  • Topic Sentence #1 will need examples to support the thesis.
    • Topic Sentence
  • Topic Sentence #2 will need a description of the character to support the thesis.
    • Topic Sentence
  • Topic Sentence #3 will need a definition within the context of the narrative to support the thesis.
    • Topic Sentence
  • Topic Sentence #4 will need an explanation of the definition to support the thesis.
    • Topic Sentence
  • Topic Sentence #5 will need an evaluation of the examples, description, definition, and explanation to support the thesis.
    • Topic Sentence

Level 4: The second lieutenant of examples, descriptions, definitions, explanations, and evaluations receives the order from the first lieutenant of topic sentences to create supporting evidence for each topic sentence so that it supports the thesis, divides the order into five manageable parts, creates supporting evidence, and gives instructions to the other noncommissioned officers of supporting evidence to support the evidence.

  • Topic Sentence #1
    • Supporting Evidence
  • Topic Sentence #2
    • Supporting Evidence
  • Topic Sentence #3
    • Supporting Evidence
  • Topic Sentence #4
    • Supporting Evidence
  • Topic Sentence #5
    • Supporting Evidence

Level 5: The other noncommissioned officers of supporting evidence receive the order from the second lieutenant of examples, descriptions, definitions, explanations, and evaluations; divide the order into five manageable parts; develop support for the supporting evidence; and give instructions to the petty officer of transition statements to end each body paragraph, prepare for the next body paragraph, and prepare to desist all activities.

  • Support Team Alpha: Support for Supporting Evidence
  • Support Team Beta: Support for Supporting Evidence
  • Support Team Charlie: Support for Supporting Evidence
  • Support Team Delta: Support for Supporting Evidence
  • Support Team Echo: Support for Supporting Evidence
  • Transition Team Ford 1
    • Body Paragraph #1: End with Transition Statement for #1
  • Transition Team Georgia 2
    • Body Paragraph #2: End with Transition Statement for #2
  • Transition Team Hawk 3
    • Body Paragraph #3: End with Transition Statement for #3
  • Transition Team Iris 4
    • Body Paragraph #4: End with Transition Statement for #4
  • Transition Team Jane 5
    • Body Paragraph #5: End with Transition Statement for #5
  • Conclusion: Prepare to desist.

Level 6: The petty officer of transition statements receives the order from the other noncommissioned officers of supporting evidence to end each body paragraph, prepares for the next body paragraph, and prepares to desist all activities; divides the order into manageable parts; and gives instructions to the enlisted men of revision support to confirm and check the accuracy of each instruction that supports the thesis (order).

Level 7: The enlisted men of revision support confirm and check for accuracy of each instruction that integrates and supports the thesis (order).

Here is a quick outline of the different roles the thesis plays within this example.

Table 25: Outline of Roles for the Thesis (The FAVORS Definition of Thesis Exercise) 

Officer Role 
Captain of the Thesis Gives instructions to the lieutenant commander of body paragraphs
Lieutenant Commander of Body Paragraphs Gives instructions to the first lieutenant of topic sentences to develop topic sentences that will support the thesis
First Lieutenant of Topic Sentences Gives instructions to the second lieutenant of examples, descriptions, definitions, explanations, and evaluations to create supporting evidence for each topic sentence to support the thesis
Second Lieutenant of examples, descriptions, definitions, explanations, and evaluations Gives instructions to the other noncommissioned officers of supporting evidence to support the evidence
Other Noncommissioned Officers of supporting evidence Give instructions to the petty officer of transition statements to end each body paragraph, prepare for the next body paragraph, and prepare to desist all activities
Petty Officer Gives instructions to the enlisted men of revision support to confirm and check the accuracy of each instruction that supports the thesis (order)
Enlisted Men of Revision Support Confirm and check for accuracy of each instruction that integrates and supports the thesis (order)

Murphy’s illustration of the command structure represents a way in which the initial order (the vision) trickles down the military command chain as individual mission objectives for different parts (people) of the whole group. Each person has an instruction (mission) from the initial vision objective and is responsible for his or her job, which is to achieve the mission successfully.

All throughout Murphy’s illustration, the order is integrated from one person and divided into different parts. Although the command order may be different for different groups who are a part of the same platoon, the order doesn’t represent a deviation from the initial vision objective.  The order is integrated at every level.

The same is true for the example I have provided above. The thesis (order) starts with the student and is integrated within the body paragraphs, topic sentences, examples, explanations, evaluations, and other supporting evidence. In essence, no paragraph should deviate from the path the thesis has set. Whichever method the student chooses for the thesis, every subsequent paragraph must consistently adhere to the mission and objective of the thesis.

Click here to print out a copy of Murphy’s excerpt.

Click here to return to “Task #7: Integrate.”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Outline Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Provide an outline of the author’s ideas. What is the outline? Describe the outline. Analyze the structure of the outline.  Follow up with an explanation of how this outline analysis fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Context Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Provide the context. Analyze the context of the story, narration, argument, essay, or any other type of literary or writing piece you are discussing. Is the context historical? Is the context literary? Is the context biblical? Does the context include a year? What is the year? What is the date? What are the dates? What are the dates in range? Does the author provide a time period? What is the time period? Does the author provide the age of a character? What is the character’s age?

Who are the primary characters? Who are the secondary characters? What is the date of composition of the literary work? What is the relationship of the character’s age to the date of composition for the piece? In considering the year and date of composition, what happens during this time historically? What are some of the major social and cultural events that parallel the year of composition? What are some of the major social and cultural events that happen on the date of composition?

Make a distinction between the two types of historical contexts: 1) the historical context that the author provides within the piece and 2) the historical context you choose to research. What are the parallels between the author’s presentation of information and the historical context you have researched?  Does the author analyze the context he or she provides? What is the author’s analysis? Does the author evaluate the context he or she analyzes? What is the author’s evaluation?

Follow up with an explanation of how this context analysis fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad.  Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Evaluation Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Provide the author’s evaluation of either the author’s argument, the author’s analysis, or the evaluation of who the author is discussing. What is the evaluation? Is the author evaluating himself? Or is the author evaluating another character within the work?

Analyze the structure of the evaluation. Judge how the author judges. Now judge the usefulness, the benefit of the author’s evaluation. Does the author make sense? Is the author logical in his or her evaluation? Does the author lack sufficient description, examples, comparisons and contrasts, definitions, or analysis in his or her evaluation?

Is the author’s evaluation flawed? What is the flaw? Define the flaw. Break down the flaw into parts.  Address each part. Follow up with an explanation of how this evaluation analysis (i.e., the author’s evaluation and your evaluation of the author’s evaluation) fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Thesis Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Provide the author’s thesis.  Analyze the thesis. What type of thesis is it? Where is this thesis located within the author’s essay or argument? How does the position of the thesis affect the rest of the essay or argument?

Does the thesis have parts? How many parts? What is the author’s plan? What is the method by which the author will accomplish the plan? Does the thesis represent the author’s plan to describe, define, provide an example, introduce a process, compare and contrast, or evaluate?

Follow up with an explanation of how the author’s thesis fits within the scheme of what you are discussing.  Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Quote Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Provide the quote. Analyze the quote. What type of quote is it? Where is this quote located within the author’s narration or argument? How does the quote affect the chronology of the narration or argument?

Does the quote have parts? How many parts? In other words, how many ideas or things or characters is the author discussing in this one quote? Does the quote represent a description, or a definition, or an example, or a process, or a comparison or contrast, or an evaluation?

Does the quote support another quote? Does the author use this quote to support any other statement, idea, character, thing, or another quote? Who is the author of the quote? Is the author a character? Or is the author the author?

Follow up with an explanation of how your quote analysis fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Author’s Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Does the author analyze his or her characters? Does the author offer an analysis of a character through a second character?  Does the author offer an analysis of a character through 3rd-person omniscient? What are the distinctions between what the character believes himself or herself to be and what the author or another character believes?

Follow up with an explanation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Follow up with an explanation of how this context analysis fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Process Analysis

This can be a separate paragraph or part of one body paragraph. Describe the process of the author. Think carefully (analyze) about the structure of the process the author undergoes. Does the author present a process that a character endures? Describe this process.

Who narrates the process? Does the author or another character narrate the process? Provide the narration, but briefly. Avoid slipping into plot summary. Are there any contrasts or comparisons that you need to make between this process you are discussing and another process somewhere else in the text?  In other words, are there any parallels? Does the process have parts? Who contributes to the process? Who doesn’t?

Answer these questions. Follow up with an explanation of how this process analysis, how you have analyzed the process of the author and the characters, fits within the scheme of what you are discussing. Follow up with an evaluation of the usefulness of this supporting evidence, whether good or bad. Develop a transition statement.

This analysis method serves as a guideline for how to develop the body paragraphs of your paper.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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