Archive for category Group Activity

Figure 79: Abbreviating Quotes Exercise (Sample Student Passage)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Second Part: Abbreviating Quotes (Task#3: Abbreviate)” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 79: Abbreviating Quotes Exercise (Sample Student Passage)

Elisa continues to glance down at the tractor shed where the men where. There is an anxiousness in Elisa. Her “face was eager . . . mature . . . handsome; even her work with the scissors was over-eager, over-powerful.  The chrysanthemum stems seemed too small and easy for her energy” (Steinbeck 221). Steinbeck paints a clear picture as to how religiously Elisa tends her garden. She takes off her glove and places her hands down into the soil.  She recognizes that her flowers hadn’t completely bloomed. She starts tending her garden at the sound of her husband’s voice. “He had come near quietly, and he leaned over the wire fence that protected her flower garden from cattle and dogs, and chickens” (Steinbeck 221). It is evident that the fence that protected the flowers was put there also to protect Elisa. It is also clear to say that the protection from the cattle, dogs, and chickens symbolizes protection from outsiders. Henry protected Elisa in the same way she protected her flowers. No one could get close or converse with Elisa. At the sound of his voice is when she can start. Everything had become so traditional that she had become accustomed to waiting until he finished his business to start her daily activity. Henry never included her in any of his business. She was best seen and not heard.

Group Activity

Step #1: Highlight the quotes by adding shading. Use a highlighter.

Step #2: Determine which of the sentences represents the topic sentence.

Step #3: Determine if the quote supports the topic sentence of the paragraph.

Step #4: Analyze the sentences that follow after the quote.

Step #5: Choose one option.

  • Option #1: Choose to keep the topic sentence and remove the quote and the follow-up explanations.
  • Option #2: Develop a different topic sentence for the quote and the follow-up explanations.
  • Option #3: Sort the sentences that appear to express the same ideas into sections. Think about the main idea of each sentence. What is the subject of the sentence doing? What is the subject of the sentence. Ask these questions during the process and provide an explanation for each section that details the main idea of each section.

Use this in-class activity as a guide for revising your own academic essays.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Figure 78: Removing Quotes Exercise

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #3: Abbreviate” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 78: Removing Quotes Exercise

Steinbeck shows Elisa startled by her own whisper; she ran back into the house and prepared for Henry’s arrival and their departure into town. In this part of the narrative, Elisa is exhaustively making preparations. After her shower, “she puts on her newest under-clothing and her nicest stockings and the dress which was the symbol of her prettiness.  She worked carefully on her hair, penciled her eyebrows and roughed her lips” (Steinbeck 226). Before, as stated earlier, Steinbeck shows Elisa as representing a man through her attire. Now the dress symbolizes, as the author states, her prettiness; or the more appealing, attractive part of Elisa. Henry comes in and comments on how nice she looks. She questions his motive and he returns dumbfounded.  He comments again on how strong she looks and she replies, “I am strong?  Yes, strong . . . I never knew before how strong . . .” (Steinbeck 226). It is clear that even though she concludes that she is strong, she still doesn’t feel it because she had to question first and answer later.

Group Activity

Figure 78 represents an excerpt of a student’s essay. Read the excerpt. Refer to Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” when necessary.

1) Count the number of sentences within the excerpt. Separate the sentences by categories:

  • quotes
  • analysis
  • plot summary

2) Total the number of quotes.

3) Total the number of sentences that represent analysis.

4) Total the number of sentences that represent plot summary.

5) Evaluate the sentences that represent analysis and plot summary.

6) Rewrite the plot summary sentences by developing an analysis.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 77: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (Plot Summary Critique)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #3: Abbreviate” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Sample Excerpt

Steinbeck shows Elisa startled by her own whisper; she ran back into the house and prepared for Henry’s arrival and their departure into town. In this part of the narrative, Elisa is exhaustively making preparations. After her shower, “she puts on her newest under-clothing and her nicest stockings and the dress which was the symbol of her prettiness. She worked carefully on her hair, penciled her eyebrows and roughed her lips” (Steinbeck 226). Before, as stated earlier, Steinbeck shows Elisa as representing a man through her attire. Now the dress symbolizes, as the author states, her prettiness; or the more appealing, attractive part of Elisa. Henry comes in and comments on how nice she looks. She questions his motive and he returns dumbfounded. He comments again on how strong she looks and she replies, “I am strong? Yes, strong . . . I never knew before how strong . . .” (Steinbeck 226). It is clear that even though she concludes that she is strong, she still doesn’t feel it because she had to question first and answer later.

Figure 77: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (Plot Summary Critique)

Problem

The student provides ample plot summary, but little to no analysis.

Questions

1) What is the context of the whisper?

2) Why does Steinbeck present so much detail about Elisa as she prepares for her husband’s arrival?

3) What is the difference between Steinbeck’s presentation of Elisa at the beginning and the presentation the reader now experiences of her?

4) Does the dress only symbolize prettiness or indicate the separation of gender roles within the context of the literary work?

5) Elisa likes comments. Why?

6) Think about two contexts: the visitor’s comments and Henry’s.

Group Activity

Answer the questions above.

Develop an analysis based upon the questions.

Refer to Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” for textual evidence.

Click here for “Figure 78: Removing Quotes Exercise.”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Table 14: Outline of Discrepancies in Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums”

Below is a table that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #2: Number” into the search box.

You may print the table for class discussions.

Table 14: Outline of Discrepancies in Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums”

Actions Student’s Essay Author’s Narrative
 Second Action 2.  Elisa notices the visitor as they pass him on the road. 2.  Elisa notices a dark speck far ahead on the road.
 
 Fourth Action 4.  She failed to tell Henry that he’d stopped by. 4.  She saw the caravan ahead as the car passed them (the little covered wagon and the mismatched team).
 
 Seventh Action 7.  Elisa notices the plants on the side of the road that the visitor throws out.

The order of events in the student’s essay is a complete mismatch to the order of events in the author’s narrative. Not only is the student’s essay filled with discrepancies but it also includes events that don’t even happen in the narrative.

The student’s assessment of these events also indicates that the student hasn’t thoroughly studied the dialogue and the narrator’s views. In other words, the student has worked primarily from memory. In writing the essay, the student did not consult the primary source to make sure to present the events chronologically. Observe the following from the student’s essay:

Discrepancy: The student essay reads that Elisa failed to tell Henry that he’d stopped by.  However, there is nothing in the narrative itself to suggest that Elisa not telling Henry of the visitor represents a failure.

Discrepancy: The student essay reads that Elisa feels dejected and defeated. The quote actually reads, “She whispered to herself sadly, ‘He might have thrown them off the road.  That wouldn’t have been much trouble, not very much. But he kept the pot’ ” (Steinbeck 261).  Elisa feels sad.

Discrepancy: Elisa doesn’t notice the plants on the side of the road. She notices a dark speck.  The narrative doesn’t indicate if the dark speck is the plant.

Discrepancy: Elisa never sees the visitor as both Elisa and Henry pass the visitor on the road. Elisa sees the caravan as both Elisa and Henry pass them, the little covered wagon, and the mismatched team.

Group Activity

Based upon the discrepancies, rewrite the student’s analysis (Figure 75).

Click here for The FAVORS Step-by-Step Process for Correcting Mismatched Chronology.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Table 13: Outline of Character Actions in Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums”

Below is a table that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #2: Number” into the search box.

You may print the table for class discussions.

Table 13: Outline of Character Actions in Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums

Actions Student’s Essay Author’s Narrative
 First Action 1.  They both leave. 1.  They both leave.
 Second Action 2.  Elisa notices the visitor as they pass him on the road. 2.  Elisa notices a dark speck far ahead on the road.
 Third Action 3.  She tried not to look, but did anyway. 3.  Elisa tried not to look as they passed it, but she looked anyway.
 Fourth Action 4.  She failed to tell Henry that he’d stopped by. 4.  She saw the caravan ahead as the car passed them (the little covered wagon and the mismatched team).
 Fifth Action 5.  She comments that their outing would be good tonight. 5.  She said, “It will be good, tonight, a good dinner.”
 Sixth Action 6.  Henry instantly noticed that she had changed again. 6.  Henry complains that she has changed again.
 Seventh Action 7.  Elisa notices the plants on the side of the road that the visitor throws out.
 Eighth Action   8.  She immediately feels dejected and defeated.

Group Activity

Circle the verbs under each column.

Develop a paragraph for each column: 1) student’s essay) and 2) author’s narrative. In other words, combine all of the actions into one paragraph. Compare and contrast both paragraphs.

Refer to the student’s analysis of Figure 75.

Develop a revised analysis of the author’s narrative based upon the actions of Elisa.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 76: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (Conclusion)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #2: Number” into the search box. Steinbeck’s work is subject to U.S. copyright law and is only displayed here for educational purposes.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 76: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (Conclusion)

 

“Elisa went into the house. She heard him drive to the gate and idle down his motor, and then she took a long time to put on her hat. She pulled it here and pressed it there. When Henry turned the motor off she slipped into her coat and went out.“The little roadster bounced along on the dirt road by the river, raising the birds and driving the rabbits into the brush. Two cranes flapped heavily over the willow-line and dropped into the river-bed.“Far ahead on the road Elisa saw a dark speck. She knew.“She tried not to look as they passed it, but her eyes would not obey. She whispered to herself sadly, ‘He might have thrown them off the road. That wouldn’t have been much trouble, not very much. But he kept the pot,’ she explained. ‘He had to keep the pot. That’s why he couldn’t get them off the road.’“The roadster turned a bend and she saw the caravan ahead. She swung full around toward her husband so she could not see the little covered wagon and the mismatched team as the car passed them.

“In a moment it was over. The thing was done. She did not look back.

“She said loudly, to be heard above the motor, ‘It will be good tonight, a good dinner.’

‘Now you’re changed again,’ Henry complained.

Group Activity

Number the actions of Steinbeck’s short story.

On a separate sheet of paper, list the actions.

Circle the verbs.

Compare the list of actions of Figure 76 to Figure 75 (student’s essay).

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 75: Essay Excerpt Reference to Conclusion in “Chrysanthemums”

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #2: Number” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 75: Essay Excerpt Reference to Conclusion in “Chrysanthemums”

“They both leave and Elisa notices the visitor as they pass him on the road. She tried not to look, but did anyway. She failed to tell Henry that he’d stopped by. She comments that their outing would be good tonight; Henry instantly noticed that she had changed again.  Elisa notices the plants on the side of the road that the visitor throws out. She immediately feels rejected and defeated” (Favors 4).

Group Activity

Number the actions of the student’s essay.

On a separate sheet of paper, write the actions.

Circle the verbs.

Refer to Figure 76: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (Conclusion).

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 74: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #1: Account” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 74: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph)

“Elisa Allen, working in her flower garden, looked down across the yard and saw Henry, her husband, talking to two men in business suits. The three of them stood by the tractor shed, each man with one foot on the side of the little Fordson. They smoked cigarettes and studied the machine as they talked. . . . “Elisa cast another glance toward the tractor shed. The strangers were getting into their Ford coupe. . . . “ ‘Henry, who were those men you were talking to?’“ ‘Why, sure, that’s what I came to tell you. They were from the Western Meat Company. I sold those thirty head of three-year-old steers. Got nearly my own price, too’ ” (Steinbeck 254-255).

Group Activity

Refer to Figure 72: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph).

Using Figure 74 above, locate the discrepancies within the student’s essay within Figure 72.

On a separate sheet of paper, list the discrepancies and number them.

Research the evidence within the author’s text.

Use the evidence to rewrite the student’s analysis.

Refer to Task #1: Account for guidance.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 73: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (1st Paragraph)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Figure 72: Essay Excerpt on ‘Chrysanthemums’ (2nd Paragraph)” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Figure 73: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums” (1st Paragraph)

“The high grey-flannel fog of winter closed off the Salinas Valley from the sky and from all the rest of the world. On every side it sat like a lid on the mountains and made of the great valley a closed pot. On the broad, level land floor the gang plows bit deep and left the black earth shining like metal where the shares had cut. On the foothill ranches across the Salinas River, the yellow stubble fields seemed to be bathed in pale cold sunshine, but there was no sunshine in the valley now in December. The thick willow scrub along the river flamed with sharp and positive yellow leaves” (Steinbeck 254).

Group Activity

Refer to Figure 72: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph).

Use the sample passage as a guide for revising the student’s analysis.

Develop a revision plan.

Rewrite the student’s analysis.

Refer to Task #1: Account description for guidance.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Figure 72: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph)

Below is an excerpt that falls under the comment “Analysis.”

You may access the comment by clicking on the “Analysis (Glossary Comment)” and “Case Studies” categories or by typing “Task #1: Account” into the search box.

You may print the excerpt for class discussions.

Account for discrepancies and contradictions. Read the following excerpt from the student essay on Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums.”

Figure 72: Essay Excerpt on “Chrysanthemums” (2nd Paragraph)

The narrative starts out with Elisa working in her flower garden. She looks down across the yard and sees Henry, her husband, talking to two businessmen; they are making a proposition to Henry for his thirty heads of three-year old steers. Elisa takes several glances at the men as they smoke cigarettes and talk; her “face was lean and strong and her eyes were as clear as water . . . her figure looked blocked and heavy in her gardening costume, a man’s black hat pulled down over her eyes, clod-hopper shoes, a figured print dress almost completely covered by a big corduroy apron with four big pockets . . .” (Steinbeck 220). Steinbeck clearly shows Elisa’s habitual activity; it is implied that she even wears the exact same thing everyday.

Group Activity

Reread the first part of Steinbeck’s “Chrysanthemums.”

Evaluate the student’s analysis within Figure 72.

Refer to a standard dictionary for clarity.

Locate the discrepancies between what Steinbeck’s writes (primary) and what the student writes (secondary).

Click here for “Figure 73: Sample Passage from Steinbeck’s ‘Chrysanthemums’ (1st Paragraph).”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment