Asking Questions about Connections

When you write your papers and begin new paragraphs, think about the “connection” between the new paragraph and the previous one. What is your motivation for incorporating the new paragraph? Why do you start the paragraph in the way that you do? Is the new paragraph in sequence to the previous one? In other words, does the example in the previous paragraph represent a “first” or a “second”? If so, what is the relation between this previous paragraph and the new? These are the questions you must always ask yourself each time you create new topic sentences for new paragraphs.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Transitions.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Revising General Statements

In revising general statements, always ask yourself why the subject is important to you.  Why do you want to discuss this subject? Then ask the following questions:

1) What relationship does my subject have to another subject?

2) What relationship does my viewpoint have to another viewpoint?

3) What relationship does the author’s viewpoint have to another author’s viewpoint”?

Once you establish the specifics, you can establish the connections, and you thereby bring in more detail, by default.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Too General to be Meaningful.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Matching Socks

When you incorporate a quote or add to what you have written already, the quote must match your ideas within the paper, especially within the paragraph you are using to convey your points.

Think of your quote and topic sentence or your quote and example as two socks that match. If you are discussing one thing but the quote you want to use is an example of something totally different, don’t use the quote. Your professor will always grade on your ability to synthesize information, how you bring together corresponding points and examples and how you incorporate them within your paper appropriately, making sure that the quote and example you use actually serve their proper functions.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “This Quote is out Context.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Rule on Referencing Characters

When referring to characters within a literary work, maintain the same context of singular and plural references.

This quick-reference topic falls under the post “Figure 56: Essay Excerpt on Christmas, Light in August.”  You may click the link to view the post. Figure 56 falls under the comment “This Doesn’t Occur/Contradiction.”

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Rule on Examining Historical Context

Of each period, examine it historically by researching such characters as the kings of a period, their relationships, and their enemies. Begin with the objective to find out the values, beliefs, and moral behavior of people during the time; the class situation; the race situation; and the economic situation of the day.

Although you are stepping a bit away from the immediate text before you, there is nothing wrong with researching the time period in which the author writes. The context of any work the author writes within is always, at least, a range from the author’s beginnings to his or her death. You may examine at least fifty years prior to the author’s work because you have to take into consideration the author’s parents, but you must never examine what the author thinks after his death, because the author can’t think and be dead at the same time.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “There is No Indication of This.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Writing Solid Papers

When you write an essay that stays true to its original form, shape, and structure, you have a paper that is solid. When the paper is solid, it has easily collectable parts and facts are credible and verifiable. It is also clear that you have built the paper on a firm foundation, on a strong thesis. On the other hand, when you write a paper that has no shape or structure, one in particular that deviates from the main points, then you have a paper that is in liquid form. With the right ingredients combined with the liquid, you can transform the paper into a solid piece of work.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Solid.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Rule on Incorporating Evidence

Each time you make a statement, you must support the statement by incorporating in-text evidence. Always remember that you are not the original writer of the text you are analyzing. Whether you decide to inform or persuade your audience or do both, your initial objective is to always prove your thesis. The way that you prove your thesis is by including evidence and facts and incorporating quotes from the author’s work.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Solid.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Using the Tool of Repetition

On an academic level, the most central reason why we use repetition as a tool within our papers is because we are at a loss for words. We have not allowed sufficient time to conduct research on the topic and on the literary work. In essence, if we knew the topic well and read the work thoroughly, we would have sufficient tools to create the analysis of our papers. We wouldn’t have to grasp for words or ideas, because the topic and the author’s work is doubly rich in content.

The best solution for revising repetitious wording is to locate those areas where you repeat phrases, statements, and ideas substantially. Remove the repetition or rephrase the sentence. If your rephrased sentence provides the same ideas as the sentence that precedes it, then remove the rephrased sentence altogether. In addition, always trust that your professor has understood your points. When your professor writes “repetition,” she is saying to you that the repetition is distracting and that it is redundant.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Repetition/Repetitious.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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“Defining” What You Mean

It is always best to define what you mean.

For example, define terms. To do this, examine the term you are using and determine first if it has any relevance to what you are discussing within your paper. If yes, then try to define it in terms of constructing a definition. Before moving forward, check to determine if the definition is a match to the dictionary meaning. After this, check to see if your definition has any connection, correlation, or match to your topic sentence or to whatever you are discussing in a particular paragraph.

The purpose of this exercise is to make certain that anything you put in the body paragraphs of your paper supports the ideas you express within your thesis. In other words, always remember your thesis. Every element of your paper that comes after the thesis must conform to the thesis.

Therefore, take a quick look at your thesis to see if your definition is appropriate to the overall subject of your paper (and the author’s work). If you have done this, and you are fine with your results, move on to the next word or group of words.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Rephrase.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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Rule on Using Transitional Phrasing

You must use transitional phrasing before moving on to the next thought; and you must also use it to signify connections between ideas housed within a paragraph. Always stop at stop signs. Yield when the yellow light is on. Go when the green light flashes. When you need to change lanes, turn on the signal.

In other words, finish one thought before going on to the next; and use transitional words such as “in addition” and “in contrast” to signal to the reader when you are continuing a thought or making a change.

This quick-reference topic falls under the comment “Rough.” You may click the link to view the post.

Copyright 2011 Regina Y. Favors. All Rights Reserved.

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